It’s Time | Women in Church


C3ED8C30-6BCF-40A0-9424-C87ADE9A5E5DNote from the author: I wrote this post a year ago for a church blog but we decided under the circumstances that it would be best for the women to have the voice exclusively. Hear we are a year later with the Harvey Weinstein revelations and the trending of #MeToo on social media, and I thought it might be a good time to share this on my own blog site.

 

We have had nearly a week to process and digest the very disturbing viral video of Donald Trump describing how he knowingly and intentionally makes unwanted sexual advances against women with impunity. To say that it has triggered massive amounts of trauma developed from lived experiences of women is an understatement. The amount of energy being expended by he and others to defend what he said, or diminish his shocking confession to little more than lewd words, is confounding. All leading to the virtual dam of silence cracking at its foundation as women are telling their stories of unwanted sexual advances, sexual harassment assault and rape. History may look back on the release of that video, and see it as a tipping point in so many realms of American society. Hopefully one of the areas of our society in which it will serve as a tipping point and catalyst for long overdue change is the church.

There is so much one could say about the fact that Donald Trump has received not simply endorsements, but moral imperatives from prominent Evangelical Christian leaders and thinkers to Christians to vote for Trump (Jerry Falwell Jr., and James Dobson among them). In essence they are saying, “If you don’t vote for Trump you are sinning against God.” Some have seemingly come to their senses and issued a wholesale revoking of their endorsement of him (Wayne Grudem).

However, I believe this all says less about Trump, and less about the decline of the Religious Right, than it does something else far more significant and in need of change. I believe the past five days says so much more on how we are long over due for women to have a more prominent role, and voice in the local church and evangelical organizations. It is long past time that women truly share in the leadership and authority in the local church and evangelical organizations. It is time for the ceiling of children and women’s ministry and the mission field be removed. It is time for more churches to appoint female deacons and elders. It is time for women to be given the chance to be executive, lead and even teaching pastors.

For too long the church has demeaned the full imago dei of women because Eve listened to the serpent.

For too long we’ve been ignoring the biblical narratives of God elevating women alongside and even in front of men, not simply because there was a void of male leadership but because they were chosen by God and they were the most qualified.

For too long we’ve given women the title of director instead of pastor in fear of offending the old guard.

For too long we’ve stifled the radicalness of Jesus affirming Mary’s choice to shun the kitchen in favor of sitting at the feet of Jesus, not as some star struck groupie but as a disciple. If Jesus believed Mary could learn to do what he does, then what is stopping us from letting them do what he does (Luke 10.38-42)? In reality it shouldn’t even be an issue of giving them permission. If not are we then guilty of ignoring what Jesus says to Martha, “Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.” If Paul believed that a new expansive understanding of how we are to see ourselves in light of the work of Christ included a loosening of conventional gender roles, “there is neither male nor female” (Galatians 3.28) have we crafted a subversive gospel message for women to get them saved and keep them in their place?

I don’t say all these things and pose all these questions to sound controversial. I say them because I’m convinced that we weren’t meant to be steeped in centuries long marginalization of women in the name of patriarchy in which the church has been complicit and often taken the lead. Then it wouldn’t be so hard for us in the church to know how to respond to Trump and those who defend his demeaning of women because women who lead alongside men in the church would be right at the forefront of our response (which is why this wasn’t posted when it was originally written because we wanted the reply of women at the forefront). Their voices would be heard from the nursery and from the pulpit. Their unique stories and lived experiences would be shared in first person before communities of men and women of all ages together. It’s not too late though for us to finally begin to model in the church what Paul says in Ephesians of submitting to one another in Christ. But this I am certain, it is long past time for it to happen.

This entry was posted in Community, Sexism, Society, The Church, Women, Women’s Rights and tagged , , , , , , , by Cedric Lundy. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cedric Lundy

As a teenager who struggled with my self esteem and where I fit in my youth group was the one place that I felt like I could be myself. It also was a place where I could discover my true identity in Christ and discover my true value in God. Over time I realized that God was calling me into full-time youth ministry by kindling a passion and desire to provide teenagers the same opportunity and atmosphere I had that served as a catalyst for me to flourish. After a number of years of doing full-time vocational youth ministry in the local church I recognize more fully the importance of being an encouragement and resource to the people who have the most potential for impact in the life of a teenager... their parents. Those are the reasons why I've begun this blog and if those reasons resonate with you then this blog is for you! Student Ministries Pastor of Middle School Ministry at Church At Charlotte. We seek to empower and release transformed followers of Christ by being stirred by God's word, struggling well with life, and serving others.

2 thoughts on “It’s Time | Women in Church

  1. Cedric, missed you Sunday:) I don’t know if you have met Maile Nelson’s sister, Rev Dr Amy Butler, who is senior pastor of the Riverside Church in Manhatten, but you should. either Maile or I can facilitate the introduction. You two would have much common ground and she could be a great help to you, I think. Let me know. Susan Kelly >

    • Hey Susan! Thanks for the invite but we already had plans. I actually ran into Tim and Maile at the greenway and Maile sent me Amy’s contact info. But thanks for the reminder. I sent her an email introducing myself.

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