Quick Reflection on 45 Year Anniversary of MLK Jr. Assassination


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On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr., was assassinated as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis Tennessee.  Much could be said of the 45 years of race relations between blacks and whites in the United States of America—some of it good, some of it not so good. Today I will say this: It is safe to say that without the vision selflessness and determination of Martin Luther King Jr. I would not be a youth pastor at a predominantly white church. 45 years later a black man can be a youth pastor to almost entirely white teenagers and families, in the south no less, due to the sacrifice of MLK. Because of King’s fearless pursuit of his dream my students don’t see me as their black youth pastor, they see me as their pastor. Because of King’s fearless pursuit of his dream parents, who like myself were born within ten year’s of his death, simultaneously understand the historical implications of their student having a youth pastor who is black and couldn’t care less.

You can say what you want about race relations between black and white Americans in this country, and how there is still work to be done for all men to see and treat men of another color as equal, but you can’t say that Martin Luther King Jr. pursued and died for his dream in vain.  45 years later if King is looking down from heaven he has plenty of reason to celebrate and be glad. 45 years later we can say of King’s dream, “mission accomplished!”

Author: Token Confessions

Perpetual Seekers of Solidarity with God through sharing in the life death and resurrection of Jesus The Christ Pastors and Communicator Shepherd Business Owners Coffee Lovers, Snobs, and Roaster Sports fan but too rational to be a fanatic Sons, Brothers, Friends, Husbands, and Fathers

One thought on “Quick Reflection on 45 Year Anniversary of MLK Jr. Assassination”

  1. I think I told you once that someone commented to me that our “black pastor” had really impacted her daughter. I was caught so off guard by that description that I had to stop and think through the staff to know who she was talking about! Obviously this parent doesn’t see you as black youth pastor either. Thanks for the positive impact you’ve had on our family — all of us, not just the ones who were in youth group!

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